The Four Worlds of Work in 2030

Digitization, the rise of automation, and shifting demographics are disrupting the way we work, and the way companies relate to workers. The dizzying pace of change makes it difficult to plan for the long-term. With so many complex forces at play, making linear predictions based on recent trends is too simplistic.

We at PwC envision four alternative future worlds of work, each named with a color. These admittedly extreme examples of how work could look in 2030 are shaped by the ways people and organizations respond to the forces of collectivism and individualism, on one axis, and integration and fragmentation on the other.

Source: Strategy+Business

Cross-Sector Partnerships Focus of NJ Chamber Committee

This is the first committee in the organization’s history that has been formed for an age demographic, rather than an industry sector, and that is deliberate. From speaking to employees who have just entered the workforce, it became clear that there are not currently any cross-sector business networking groups for young business minds that can offer quite the same access to fellow professionals afforded by the Chamber. Careers are likely to involve working for multiple companies and may well span different industries, and we hope that critical cross-sector connections made early on will prove invaluable in the future.

Source: Eliot Lincoln via Jersey Evening Post

Digital Footprint Tutorials

Everyday, whether we want to or not, most of us contribute to a growing portrait of who we are online; a portrait that is probably more public than most of us assume. So no matter what you do online it’s important that you know what kind of trail you’re leaving, and what the possible effects can be. These tutorials help you to not only learn about your digital footprints, but help you make the right choices for you.

Source: Internet Society

RBC CEO: Ignoring the Future of Work, Canada’s ‘Quiet Crisis’

On Vancouver Island, TimberWest is searching for foresters who can harvest data as well as trees. In Alberta, Suncor is working with First Nations peoples to build a new pipeline of talent, with aboriginal youth who can work with new technologies such as self-driving trucks. And in Toronto, Saint Elizabeth Health Care is looking to advance digital and communications skills to assist patients in their homes or remotely.

Canadians and Canadian companies are embracing the next generation of tech like never before. Unfortunately, the way we go about educating and employing the next generation of Canadians isn’t keeping pace. It’s our quiet crisis and it’s about to get a lot louder if we don’t take the future of work more seriously.

Source: Dave McKay via The Globe and Mail

Co-Working with Virtual Strangers, Good for Business?

For many of us, the concept of a co-worker revolves around sharing a physical space with someone else. But in this day of virtual realities, many of us are discovering that some of our co-workers may actually be strangers. By engaging in a virtual space with virtual strangers, it allows for individuals to work on their sections of a project concurrently as opposed to having to wait for one person to finish a part of the project before someone else can work on it.

Source: Freelancers Union

Time to Focus on Process

In a quest to find a solution that works for everyone, we too often invest in ideas that don’t work particularly well for anyone. In 2018, my aspirational prediction is that journalism shifts its focus on innovation toward investing in processes, rather than platforms and products. Too many good ideas are discarded because they don’t fit the dominant model of “scalable” and “replicable,” which is too narrow in scope.

Source: MIT’s Sam Ford via Nieman Lab

Coaching, Caring and Connecting Are Shaping the Future of Jobs

Jobs like walker/talker, fitness commitment counsellor, digital tailor, ethical sourcing manager, AI business development manager and man-machine teaming manager are among the tech jobs that are expected to be on the HR radar in the next five years.

These jobs share the common theme of Coaching, Caring and Connecting: Coaching being the human ability to help others get better at life; Caring being the human endeavour of improving people’s health; and Connecting being the intellectual leverage only humans can bring in connecting man with machine, traditional with shadow IT, physical with virtual, and most importantly, commerce with ethics.

Source: The Hindu Business Line

Maker vs. Manager: Your Schedule Can Make or Break You

Managers don’t necessarily need the capacity for deep focus — they primarily need the ability to make fast, smart decisions. A maker’s schedule is different. It is made up of long blocks of time reserved for focusing on particular tasks, or the entire day might be devoted to one activity. Breaking their day up into slots of a few minutes each would be the equivalent of doing nothing.

Pausing to drink some water, stretch, or get fresh air is the type of break that recharges makers and helps them focus better when they get back to work. Pausing to hear about a coworker’s marital problems or the company’s predictions for the next quarter has the opposite effect. A break and time spent not working are very different. One fosters focus, the other snaps it.

Source: Farnam Street

Upwork CEO Stephane Kasriel: 4 Predictions for the Future of Work

The talent war of the future will no longer be between companies, it will be between cities. As technology untethers society, and remote work becomes the norm, people will live in the cities of their choosing, rather than the ones that are nearest to where they work. The cities of their choosing will have a certain “vibe” by offering attractive living options in tech-friendly environments.

Source: World Economic Forum