Portable Reputations Would Fix Gig Ratings Mess

The platform economy has the potential to be wildly democratizing, because more transparent networks for finding work should mean larger numbers of people getting new opportunities. But many of these platforms don’t let workers have any control over their reputations.

Those of us striving to organize workers in the online economy have to build a theory for reputation portability and protection into our other work. We can’t let reputation management become disaggregated from the platforms on which workers get work. We should build organizations that can evolve as the tech work evolves.

Source: Kati Sipp via Wired

How to Make Ideas, Innovation Count in Today’s ‘Tomorrow Workplace’

Simply deploying a social network and expecting automatic engagement and a culture of social collaboration from employees is an optimistic laden exercise in futility. Social software is only effective if your targeted users (employees or customers) are actually using it for communication.

  1. Seek out diversity
  2. Understand the motivations of the crowd to participate and engage your audience
  3. Successfully identify and pursue the right ideas for business outcomes
  4. Get the outcomes you want through rewards and recognition
  5. Measure effectiveness and usage

Employees’ cognitive surplus is the most valuable, most under-utilized asset organizations have. Tap into that surplus and encourage the best ideas to come to the forefront through more targeted, specific innovation management platforms.

Source: Wired

The Four Worlds of Work in 2030

Digitization, the rise of automation, and shifting demographics are disrupting the way we work, and the way companies relate to workers. The dizzying pace of change makes it difficult to plan for the long-term. With so many complex forces at play, making linear predictions based on recent trends is too simplistic.

We at PwC envision four alternative future worlds of work, each named with a color. These admittedly extreme examples of how work could look in 2030 are shaped by the ways people and organizations respond to the forces of collectivism and individualism, on one axis, and integration and fragmentation on the other.

Source: Strategy+Business

Cross-Sector Partnerships Focus of NJ Chamber Committee

This is the first committee in the organization’s history that has been formed for an age demographic, rather than an industry sector, and that is deliberate. From speaking to employees who have just entered the workforce, it became clear that there are not currently any cross-sector business networking groups for young business minds that can offer quite the same access to fellow professionals afforded by the Chamber. Careers are likely to involve working for multiple companies and may well span different industries, and we hope that critical cross-sector connections made early on will prove invaluable in the future.

Source: Eliot Lincoln via Jersey Evening Post

Digital Footprint Tutorials

Everyday, whether we want to or not, most of us contribute to a growing portrait of who we are online; a portrait that is probably more public than most of us assume. So no matter what you do online it’s important that you know what kind of trail you’re leaving, and what the possible effects can be. These tutorials help you to not only learn about your digital footprints, but help you make the right choices for you.

Source: Internet Society

RBC CEO: Ignoring the Future of Work, Canada’s ‘Quiet Crisis’

On Vancouver Island, TimberWest is searching for foresters who can harvest data as well as trees. In Alberta, Suncor is working with First Nations peoples to build a new pipeline of talent, with aboriginal youth who can work with new technologies such as self-driving trucks. And in Toronto, Saint Elizabeth Health Care is looking to advance digital and communications skills to assist patients in their homes or remotely.

Canadians and Canadian companies are embracing the next generation of tech like never before. Unfortunately, the way we go about educating and employing the next generation of Canadians isn’t keeping pace. It’s our quiet crisis and it’s about to get a lot louder if we don’t take the future of work more seriously.

Source: Dave McKay via The Globe and Mail

Co-Working with Virtual Strangers, Good for Business?

For many of us, the concept of a co-worker revolves around sharing a physical space with someone else. But in this day of virtual realities, many of us are discovering that some of our co-workers may actually be strangers. By engaging in a virtual space with virtual strangers, it allows for individuals to work on their sections of a project concurrently as opposed to having to wait for one person to finish a part of the project before someone else can work on it.

Source: Freelancers Union