Why People Leave Facebook

This 2013 HuffPost article on why folks leave Facebook is strangely coercive and symptomatic of a sort of Stockholm syndrome that’s infested marketing for years.

hiatus

A “toxic shock” has resulted from the algorithmic infection proliferated by News Feed, Google Search and other neocolonialist forms of digital content curation. The simple fact that Facebook impairs the ability to obtain objective information and engage meaningfully is reason enough to keep the social network at arm’s length.

As of 2014, all HuffPost comments are on Facebook’s system. This implies a conflict of interest for editors who would promote opinions that portray the network in a bad light. A smart move by a social network in crisis control mode, managing how millions of left-leaning millennials learn and share about it.

Facebook founders have since come out against the social network, admitting to what many suspect: that Facebook is, as a hacker might say, designed to exploit a vulnerability in human psychology. But we’re here. What happens now?

Want to bypass the drama and create a stronger bond with your audience?

  1. Expand your reach to additional platforms;
  2. Facilitate and implement diversified content streams;
  3. Go deeper with your engagement;
  4. Start a podcast;
  5. Set up a listserv for each demographic or interest you serve; and
  6. Most importantly, be proactive, listen, and reciprocate.

More on Facebook’s house of cards here. Have your own story? Please share.

1. There goes art, imitating life again.

Social networks are infamous authors of the human condition, where vulnerability submissions are fatal, and identities bear the sharpest points of contention.

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Image: Silvia Pelissero

In the beginning, computer-mediated communication (CMC) was fractured, a broken mirror of the real world. Only now, backed by a state-sponsored clandestine web of “social media” is a person truly free to follow the rules and abide by her interpellated (socially constructed) self — an open book of invisible ink.

The darknets and Zoklet’s maverick spaces have further normalized the surface, where comment-free news sets the tone for a more civilized citizen who pens her thoughts where they belong — on social networks — where truth is regulated, monitored and configured, sliced and pared, stored for further use and sold to the highest bidder for matters of criminal justice, crime and surveillance.

She’ll give your skill for storytelling a woop woop. Beyond that, you’re on your own.

My Strategy Featured in Routledge Guide to Health Communication

When George Mason University’s David Anderson invited me to contribute to Health and Safety Communication: A Practical Guide Forward, I wanted to bring attention to an influential yet unseen demographic: diverse elders.

For diverse elders, invisibility is a barrier to support. In 2015, a national advocacy group asked me to design and implement a consumer portal and digital campaign for its housing initiative. Focused on diverse elders, the national initiative mobilizes support, innovates services and educates people on issues ranging from housing and long term care to cultural competency and mental health.

The 300-page guide published by Routledge looks at how professionals engage with their audiences. A digital campaign I led in Spring 2016 yielded record engagement for the organization and boosted support for diverse elders across generational lines.

By designing a more inclusive consumer ed approach to engagement, we were able to triple our reach and then some. I hope our success, which I outlined in “Creating empathy through intergenerational dialogue” (page 20) inspires professionals as they navigate new terrain in digital marketing and public policy.

It’s Time to Ditch the Work Silos

Diversifying can move your team toward a more service-oriented approach to engagement. At TechSoup, I led a team of experts to position the forum as a global resource for nonprofits, as well as a content partner for Microsoft, Adobe and Box. My latest for LinkedIn Pulse uses Daniel Pink’s “Motivation 3.0” (autonomy, mastery and purpose) to make the case for workplace collaboration.

Read on LinkedIn

Tech Overlords Afraid of Smartphones

The Facebook engineer who made the “like” button is avoiding the addiction culture he created. He says even things made with the best intentions can have “unintended, negative consequences.” His answer? Setting his phone’s parental controls to keep him away from apps. He and other tech insiders are “weaning themselves off their own products,” sending their kids to elite schools where devices are banned. Now, they’re worried that social media could kill democracy. Planned obsolescence?