Toronto’s Data-Laden Quayside Raises Surveillance Concerns

Quayside, as the project is known, will be laden with sensors and cameras tracking everyone who lives, works or merely passes through the area. In what Sidewalk Labs calls a marriage of technology and urbanism, the resulting mass of data will be used to further shape and refine the new city.

But extending the surveillance powers of one of the world’s largest tech companies from the virtual world to the real one raises privacy concerns for many residents. Others caution that, when it comes to cities, data-driven decision making can be misguided and undemocratic.

Source: The Seattle Times

Decentralization: The Future of Online Social Networking

Social networking forms an important part of online activities of Web users. However, social networking sites present two problems. Firstly, these sites form information silos. Information on one site is not usable in the others. Secondly such sites do not allow users much control over how their personal information is disseminated, which results in potential privacy problems.

david-simonds-closed-social-networks
Illustration: David Simonds for The Economist, 2008

This paper presents how these problems can be solved by adopting a decentralized approach to online social networking. With this approach, users do not have to be bounded by a particular social networking service. This can provide the same or even higher level of user interaction as with many of the popular social networking sites we have today. It also allows users to have more control over their own data.

A decentralized social networking framework described is based on open technologies such as Linked Data [Berners-Lee 2006], Semantic Web ontologies, open single-signon identity systems, and access control.

Source: MIT

Chief Data Officers Need a Network

The reason the Civic Analytics Network is successful is the incredible support system they have in place. When the group published An Open Letter to the Open Data Community, I saw a group that shared many of the same thoughts as I do. What resonated was that the group was able to develop some consensus about where “open data portals” should be headed, share that out into the community; and that the private sector responded. We need this same support system too.

Source: Tyler Kleykamp via Medium

Leading 2017 Urban Trends: Cross-Sector Work, Green Transportation

City leaders have developed a greater focus on sustainability and integrating technology and data into their operations, a shift that’s reflected in a number of smart city-focused conferences aimed at expanding the industry. Partnerships aren’t only forming between public and private entities; municipalities increasingly are partnering with each other to take on big projects.

Source: Smart Cities Dive

Coaching, Caring and Connecting Are Shaping the Future of Jobs

Jobs like walker/talker, fitness commitment counsellor, digital tailor, ethical sourcing manager, AI business development manager and man-machine teaming manager are among the tech jobs that are expected to be on the HR radar in the next five years.

These jobs share the common theme of Coaching, Caring and Connecting: Coaching being the human ability to help others get better at life; Caring being the human endeavour of improving people’s health; and Connecting being the intellectual leverage only humans can bring in connecting man with machine, traditional with shadow IT, physical with virtual, and most importantly, commerce with ethics.

Source: The Hindu Business Line

Collaboration Makes Smarter Communities

Across the nation, communities are building smarter energy infrastructure that leverages the power of data to solve problems. These projects will spur economic development, improve sustainability, enhance public safety and drive efficiencies — ultimately creating a better quality of life for citizens. For more of these projects to become reality, key stakeholders in the community, private industry and government must understand how best to work together.

Source: Smart Cities Dive

The FCC Just Killed Net Neutrality

It finally happened: the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) just voted to end net neutrality — the regulation that prohibits internet service providers from blocking certain services, slowing down particular websites, or charging more to access them. In a close 3-2 vote, the commissioners chose to remove the Obama-era regulations enforcing net neutrality. The vote also signifies a more philosophical shift: the FCC will no longer consider the internet a utility, further restricting the commission’s ability to regulate it.

Source: Futurism

Unlocking the Circular Economy

Digital transformation of the Fourth Industrial Revolution holds the potential to redefine the very basis of our materials-reliant industrial economy. Enabled by the internet of things, a new model of growth gaining independence from finite resource extraction is emerging. Can pervasive connectivity become the new infrastructure enabling effective material flows, keeping products and materials at their highest value at all times, thus enabling the coming of age of the circular economy?

Source: World Economic Forum